Net Zero Space initiative launches from Paris conference

Net Zero Space initiative launches from Paris conference

Including satellite operators, launchers, space agencies, academic and civil bodies, those taking part are committed to taking concrete actions to tackle reducing the debris orbiting Earth. For example, measures to contain and mitigate the generation of in-orbit debris.

The organisations involved in Net Zero Space are: Arianespace, Astroscale, CGSTL/Chang Guang Satellite, CNES, EU SST Eutelsat,  International Institute of Air and Space Law, Isispace, Planet, Share my Space and SpaceAble.

Referencing Article I of the Outer Space Treaty of 1967* – that the exploration and use of space are “the province of all mankind” – the declaration states:


“We are calling on all stakeholders worldwide to join us in supporting the ‘Net Zero Space’ initiative. When announcing their support, all stakeholders will commit to declaring concrete, tangible example(s) of actions they took, or are planning to undertake, in accordance with the scale of their operations and within their means so as to contribute to the ‘Net Zero Space’ goal.”

The organisations made the declaration at the 4th edition of the Paris Peace Forum, which took place 11-13 November. It’s a French initiative for multilateral gatherings addressing global governance issues.

Eutelsat, Arianespace

Eutelsat, the Paris-based satellite operator, highlighted its rate in excess of 95% for deorbiting its spacecraft, well ahead of the industry average, it noted.

“As a leading global satellite operator, it is of paramount importance for us to maintain a safe and sustainable outer space environment,” said Eutelsat Deputy CEO Michel Azibert. “Taking no action would increase the risk of space asset collisions, undermine the safety and sustainability of space operations and inflate the cost of access to the most useful orbits.”

For it’s part, Arianespace – the Paris-based launch service provider – highlighted the proliferation of satellites and the need for sustainability.

“There are about 4,700 operational satellites currently in orbit, and this number could rise to more than 25,000 by the end of the decade,” said Stéphane Israël, Chief Executive Officer of Arianespace. “We must therefore urgently address the question of our responsibility in relation to the increased use of space, so we can safeguard the benefits for humanity over the long haul. The charter fully reflects Arianespace’s long-term policy in support of a sustainable and responsible space sector.”

You can read more on the Paris Peace Forum website.

Image: SpaceX, Paris Peace Forum

* Article I states, in full:
The exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be carried out for the benefit and in the interests of all countries, irrespective of their degree of economic or scientific development, and shall be the province of all mankind.

Outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, shall be free for exploration and use by all States without discrimination of any kind, on a basis of equality and in accordance with international law, and there shall be free access to all areas of celestial bodies.

There shall be freedom of scientific investigation in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and States shall facilitate and encourage international cooperation in such investigation.

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