James Webb Space Telescope passes key launch review

James Webb Space Telescope passes key launch review

It will launch on an Ariane 5 rocket from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana.

It’s an international mission, with the joint NASA-ESA–CSA (Canadian Space Agency) space telescope intended to succeed the Hubble Space Telescope as NASA’s flagship astrophysics mission. The ESA, specifically, is providing the observatory’s launch service.

The review was carried out by Arianespace – the launch service provider – and confirms the Webb spacecraft and the flight plan are set for launch and that all aspects of the launch vehicle and spacecraft are fully compatible.


All technical evaluations performed by the company, on the mission’s key aspects including the launch trajectory and payload separation, showed positive results, says ESA,

“We are thrilled to have passed this important step towards the launch of Webb and to have received the green light from Arianespace and NASA,” said Peter Rumler, ESA Webb project manager.

You can see how the James Webb Space Telescope will fit inside the Ariane rocket below.

James Webb Space Telescope passes key launch review

Webb’s partners are working towards a launch readiness date of 31 October 2021, but this will be confirmed closer to the date, depending on the spaceport’s launch schedule.

The telescope is named after James E. Webb, a NASA administrator who played an important part in the Apollo program.

You can read more information about the Webb mission online.

Image: Artist’s impression of the Webb telescope on an Ariane 5 rocket

Recommended Articles

  • James Webb Space Telescope passes key launch review

    ESA invites mobile app developers to Space App Camp 2021

  • James Webb Space Telescope passes key launch review

    ESA’s Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer begins environmental testing

  • James Webb Space Telescope passes key launch review

    Wisa Woodsat wooden CubeSat heading to Earth’s orbit

  • James Webb Space Telescope passes key launch review

    Replica ExoMars rover completes its first simulated drive