In 20 years, a quarter of adults would be willing to date a robot: as long as it looks like a real person

In 20 years, a quarter of adults would be willing to date a robot: as long as it looks like a real personrobotDating – as long as it looks like a real person. The results are part of a public survey to imagine a world in 2036, including questions about implanted chips and pills replacing food. ” src=”https://img.oemao.com/201606/20/132521141.jpg” data-link=”” />Researchers have found that about a quarter of young British people are willing to date a robot – as long as it looks like a real person. The results are part of a public survey to imagine a world in 2036, including questions about implanted chips and pills replacing food.
ink=”” />The “Unique Experience Interactive Robot” – “Jiajia” developed by Professor Li Xiaoping of the University of Science and Technology of China and his colleagues was unveiled not long ago. During the presentation, Li Xiaoping greeted “Jiajia”, who immediately replied: “Yes master, what can I do for you?”
ink=”” />An independent study investigates the relationship between humans and robots—and in particular, what intimacy humans and robots can achieve. The results showed that two-thirds of men said they would like to try a sex robot; the same proportion of women said they would not.

Sina Technology News Beijing time on May 3, according to the British “Daily Mail” report, the film plot depicting the love between humans and robots may soon become a reality, because more and more people have been able to accept the relationship with the robot. Robot dating.

Researchers have found that about a quarter of young British people are willing to date a robot – as long as it looks like a real person. The results are part of a public survey to imagine a world in 2036, including questions about implanted chips and pills replacing food.

Market research firm ComRes, in partnership with the UK’s National Foundation for Science, Technology and the Arts (NESTA), conducted the research on 1,000 UK adults aged 18 to 34. The main purpose of the research is to promote FutureFest, a weekend event that encourages and challenges concepts about the future.

“Thanks to technology and society, our bodies, our identities and our senses are enhanced,” said co-founder of body>data>space, a London-based creative firm, and “Future Festival”. Ghislaine Boddington, one of the managers, said, “In fact, intimacy as we know it is expanding its outer edge, allowing us to experience love and affection that goes beyond the physical and into a virtual state.”

In addition to 26% of people willing to date an AI, 50% of Britons who use a contactless bank card support having a chip implanted under the skin, making it easier to open doors and punch at work. But while some are excited about the many possibilities ahead, many are cautious. Around 62% of people in the survey said they would not switch real food for alternative pills, while 33% firmly said tea would remain the most popular drink in the UK by 2036.

“As human beings, we are born with our own inner crystal ball of the future,” said musician and author Pat Kane, “We have an instinct for a better and more exciting world to come. Dreams and plans.”

Last month, an independent study looked into the human-robot relationship — and in particular, what intimacy humans and robots can achieve. The results showed that two-thirds of men said they would like to try a sex robot; the same proportion of women said they would not. But while opinions differ, both men and women in the survey agree that sex robots are more appropriate than hiring human sex workers.

“I think it’s important to realize that both sex robots and companion robots are social robots that affect people,” says Matthias Scheutz, a computer scientist at Tufts University in the US, “especially to realize that these machines may It will bring potential emotional harm to people.” (Ren Tian)

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